Category Archives: Splendora Photographer

HAPPY NEW YEAR!!!! 

It’s hard to believe that we’re already 10 days into the new year, but that also means that Valentine’s Day is RIGHT, AROUND THE CORNER!

Valentine’s Day Sessions are now being scheduled and they will go FAST!!!  These are quick-take sessions and will only last about 30 minutes.  The session fee is only $45 and collections start at $175.  And I’m happy to say this year I’m offering print & digital collections!  Appointments are available during the week from now until February 9, 2018 and the weekends of January 27th, February 3rd, & February 10th. 💟💟💟

Book your session before January 20th and you’ll receive a gift of custom-created Valentines to pass out!

Call or email to schedule – 281-804-3148 … info@hebertphoto.com

 

Announcing the Annual Celebration of Smiles Event

This year I’ll be hosting two events to help raise money for Operation Smile (a group that is very near and dear to my heart).

First of all, for a small donation of $24  you can update your professional headshot and save a smile too (only applies to “in-studio” business portrait sessions at the studio of Sheila Hebert Photography in Splendora, Texas).  These sessions usually take about 30-minutes.  If you’d like to purchase now and use for later, we can do that too!  The Celebration Of Smiles ~ Headshot Event is going on now through April 21, 2017.

Give me a call or email to get scheduled (281-804-3148 / info@hebertphoto.com)

SMILE:)

ps…more info coming soon on the 2nd event (just a little hint…it involves ducks and bunnies:)!

Today’s tip is going to be a quick lesson on a very helpful camera setting.  So a very long time ago, I posted a {Tip} on Tuesday that gave little explanations for different camera modes.  And I also said AGAIN…READ YOUR MANUAL.  You’ve had plenty of time to do that, right?  Hehe!  You can read the tip here if ya want: Camera Modes.

So today let’s talk about Aperture Priority today – on your camera dial it’s Av {most of the time}top-of-camera

 

So first of all what is APERTURE?  Basically, the aperture is the size of the lens opening and controls how much light is allowed to come into the lens.  When you talk about aperture, you might hear the term “f/stops” – for example… f/2.8, f/5.6, f/16, etc.  The numbers indicate your lens opening.  This is where it can get a bit confusing.  The smaller the f/stop number, the larger the opening on your lens.  When your lens is “wide open” (at it’s largest lens opening), it will have a smaller f/stop number.  So when your aperture is set to f/5.6, the lens opening will be larger than an aperture set to f/22.  When you have a smaller f/stop number, your lens can allow more light to pass to the sensor (or film).  A larger f/stop number allows less light.  That’s important to remember!!!  So if you’re outside on a bright day what do you think your aperture should be set at?  A smaller f/stop number will allow A LOT of light which may overexpose your image, but a larger f/stop number (let’s say f/16) will let LESS light in.    Controlling the amount of light is ONE reason to think about your aperture.

The next reason is controlling the depth of field.  In layman terms, depth of field means how much of the image is in focus.  If you are photographing a flower, you may not want everything in the image to be in focus so you would want to create a small depth of field.  The opposite is true for a landscape image, here you may want the entire scene in focus so you’d want a large depth of field.  Your aperture can control your depth of field.  The smaller the f/stop number (or the larger the lens opening), the smaller your depth of field {less of the image will be in focus}.  And vice versa for a larger f/stop number or a small lens opening {more of the image will be in focus}.  So think about the flower you want to focus on.  What would your aperture be if you wanted to focus just on the flower and have everything else blurred out?   If you said a smaller aperture number (f/stop), you are correct.  Now think about a landscape image or a large group of people where you want everyone to be in focus.  What would you set your aperture too?  A larger f/stop number!!!

Now that you know what the aperture does, next week I’ll talk more about using the aperture priority mode on your camera.  Until then, keep practicing:)

 

 

What a fabulous year 2016 was!!! I feel incredibly blessed to have had such a small part in your life – THANK YOU to all my clients for giving me the opportunity to photograph you, your families, and your events!

Here’s to a healthy, happy, and prosperous new year!

Wayne Gretzky said “You miss 100% of the shots you don’t take” – he was referring of course to hockey, but this true for photography too.  You never know what you can capture with your camera until you use it.  Basically, the more you practice,  the more you learn.

I just recently finished teaching a class for the Lone Star College Life-Long Learner Department and came to realize that photography is really not meant to be taught in a traditional classroom setting.  Sure it can be – but it’s kind of like trying to teach science from a textbook only.  Sure you can memorize all the terms, but where you really learn & begin to understand science is in a lab or out in the field.  Same for photography – just imagine your learning lab is the whole entire world!!!  But YES, you still need to read your camera manual (I wonder how many times I’ll say that :).

Learning to photograph anything is just best learned with a “hands-on approach”.  But don’t just take your camera out in the world and just randomly click the shutter button. Instead shoot with a purpose – try to challenge yourself to see things in a different way and try to photograph the ordinary, everyday life things with a different perspective.  Your challenge is to turn something “boring” into some interesting by conjuring up your artistic side.

Ask yourself a few questions:  How could I make this interesting?  How should I crop the scene?  Do the colors and the lighting really set the mood of the image?  What’s the best angle?  Take your time, think about the best composition of the image you want to create, and then click!  (SIDE NOTE:  These rules don’t apply to walking or running babies or animals lol – in that case, just shoot, shoot, shoot!  I’m kind of kidding – only a little:).

So today, I’ll give you one composition tip to get started:

The Rule of Thirds! 

The rule of thirds is an artistic principle that goes back as far as the ancient Greeks and this is BIG DADDY of all composition rules (and usually the first taught in an art class)!  Imagine the object and/or scene has a “tic-tac-toe” grid around it.  The intersecting points (called saddle points) is where you really want to place the main subject of your image to make it more interesting and more pleasing to your eye.  Take a look at the Mona Lisa and ask yourself where her face is???  If you look carefully you’ll notice that it’s in the top third of the image.  I’m pretty sure this was no accident and Da Vinci did this on purpose.

Although these are no “Mona Lisa(s)”, here are a few images I’ve taken that demonstrate the rule of thirds.

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Tip…Most camera phones and some traditional cameras have a grid you can turn on to help you “see” the rule of thirds better.  READ YOUR MANUAL to find out how to turn it on:)

Until next time…

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