Category Archives: Greater East Montgomery County Photographer

Announcing the Annual Celebration of Smiles Event

This year I’ll be hosting two events to help raise money for Operation Smile (a group that is very near and dear to my heart).

First of all, for a small donation of $24  you can update your professional headshot and save a smile too (only applies to “in-studio” business portrait sessions at the studio of Sheila Hebert Photography in Splendora, Texas).  These sessions usually take about 30-minutes.  If you’d like to purchase now and use for later, we can do that too!  The Celebration Of Smiles ~ Headshot Event is going on now through April 21, 2017.

Give me a call or email to get scheduled (281-804-3148 / info@hebertphoto.com)

SMILE:)

ps…more info coming soon on the 2nd event (just a little hint…it involves ducks and bunnies:)!

Today’s tip is going to be a quick lesson on a very helpful camera setting.  So a very long time ago, I posted a {Tip} on Tuesday that gave little explanations for different camera modes.  And I also said AGAIN…READ YOUR MANUAL.  You’ve had plenty of time to do that, right?  Hehe!  You can read the tip here if ya want: Camera Modes.

So today let’s talk about Aperture Priority today – on your camera dial it’s Av {most of the time}top-of-camera

 

So first of all what is APERTURE?  Basically, the aperture is the size of the lens opening and controls how much light is allowed to come into the lens.  When you talk about aperture, you might hear the term “f/stops” – for example… f/2.8, f/5.6, f/16, etc.  The numbers indicate your lens opening.  This is where it can get a bit confusing.  The smaller the f/stop number, the larger the opening on your lens.  When your lens is “wide open” (at it’s largest lens opening), it will have a smaller f/stop number.  So when your aperture is set to f/5.6, the lens opening will be larger than an aperture set to f/22.  When you have a smaller f/stop number, your lens can allow more light to pass to the sensor (or film).  A larger f/stop number allows less light.  That’s important to remember!!!  So if you’re outside on a bright day what do you think your aperture should be set at?  A smaller f/stop number will allow A LOT of light which may overexpose your image, but a larger f/stop number (let’s say f/16) will let LESS light in.    Controlling the amount of light is ONE reason to think about your aperture.

The next reason is controlling the depth of field.  In layman terms, depth of field means how much of the image is in focus.  If you are photographing a flower, you may not want everything in the image to be in focus so you would want to create a small depth of field.  The opposite is true for a landscape image, here you may want the entire scene in focus so you’d want a large depth of field.  Your aperture can control your depth of field.  The smaller the f/stop number (or the larger the lens opening), the smaller your depth of field {less of the image will be in focus}.  And vice versa for a larger f/stop number or a small lens opening {more of the image will be in focus}.  So think about the flower you want to focus on.  What would your aperture be if you wanted to focus just on the flower and have everything else blurred out?   If you said a smaller aperture number (f/stop), you are correct.  Now think about a landscape image or a large group of people where you want everyone to be in focus.  What would you set your aperture too?  A larger f/stop number!!!

Now that you know what the aperture does, next week I’ll talk more about using the aperture priority mode on your camera.  Until then, keep practicing:)

 

 

Can you believe it’s already less than one month until Valentine’s Day 2017?!?!  Well, it is and the SWEETEST sessions of the year are taking place now!!!

The Valentine’s Day Quick Take Sessions will last around 15 minutes – these sessions are perfect for babies (5 months or older…strong sitters preferred) and children up to about 10 years of age.   Your session includes up to 6 digital files with a print release or a $70 studio credit.  The special cost of this quick-take session is ONLY $125 (plus tax).

The sessions will take place at my photography studio in Splendora, Texas and we have 3 different backgrounds to choose from and are available until February 10, 2017.  For your convenience, appointment times are offered Tuesday – Friday from 10am until 6:00pm.  Saturday appointment times are VERY, VERY limited.  Please call the studio (281-804-3148) or email (info@hebertphoto.com) to schedule your appointment or for more information.

PS…No session fee to Baby Club or Graduate Members:)

sheila hebert photography valentine day mini sessions

What a fabulous year 2016 was!!! I feel incredibly blessed to have had such a small part in your life – THANK YOU to all my clients for giving me the opportunity to photograph you, your families, and your events!

Here’s to a healthy, happy, and prosperous new year!

So it’s been awhile since I’ve posted a “Mine on Monday”, but recently I had the chance to do a quick session with my L’s (the L’s stand for Laynee, Laycee, and Lori – my two nieces and my daughter).  It’s been about 4 years since I’ve photographed them in the pumpkin patch and I would say that they’ve grown just a bit!!!  Awww…I love watching them grow into beautiful young ladies, but there is a part of me that would just like to go back in time.

 

A daughter may outgrow your lap, but she will never outgrow your heart.  ~Author Unknown

 

The L’s from 4 years ago!!!

ls-10-2016-3409

Lori ~ 2016

ls-10-2016-3374

Laynee ~ 2016

ls-10-2016-3401

Laycee ~ 2016

F a c e b o o k
T w i t t e r